Richard Chen

Propositional Logic 1: The Basics

Last Edited January 3, 2016
Created April 9, 2016

Hey folks, so as a U of T Computer Science student, one concept that I've studied here and strangely enjoyed is the idea of propositional logic. Those of you taking courses like CSC165 and CSC236 will be introduced to this sort of notation, which is critical in writing proofs and reasoning in the field of software design. Thus, today I'm going to begin a series of articles for any students in these courses on propositional logic in case something isn't clear for any of you.

Chess Endgames 5: King + Pawn vs. King, Part 2

Last Edited January 3, 2016
Created April 9, 2016

Hey y'all, so I figured that the concept of the opposition requires a little more explanation, given how confusingly it was presented in the previous example. It takes a little time to wrap your head around, but in the end you'll find that more than not, seizing the opposition is more often a way to win than a waste of time.

Chess Endgames 4: King + Pawn vs. King

Last Edited January 3, 2016
Created April 9, 2016

In chess, the closest thing you can get to a gun battle in the Wild West is the endgame of the King and Pawn vs. King. In these endgames, White can only win if (s)he promotes his/her pawn to a queen (or, in some cases, a rook), and the best that Black can do is try to prevent White from accomplishing that at all. Either case is likely to occur, and what happens depends largely on whose move it is and how the pieces are positioned. In fact, given some circumstances, having the move is more of a disadvantage more than an advantage, with extreme cases resulting in zugzwang, the German term for "train stuck", which means that the side to move otherwise does not have a bad position, but regardless of how (s)he moves, (s)he is lost.

Chess Endgames 3: Stalemate Tricks

Last Edited January 3, 2016
Created April 9, 2016

Chess players, even those that are very advanced computers, constantly make mistakes. The most obvious consequence of such a mistake usually results in the opponent gaining some sort of advantage and thus being able to checkmate your king. However, even when the chips are down, there can be some strong ways to make a comeback: sometimes these result in surprise victories, but more often than not, it often ends with the weak side salvaging the game and creating a draw, the next best thing to a victory. One of these tactics includes stalemate: if one side, given his/her turn, cannot move, then the game is automatically drawn. Stalemate is not one of those things that just happens by accident, but is also a clever tactic that the losing side can engineer to make the opponent ragequit without actually losing.

Chess Basics 1: Algebraic Notation, Part 1

Last Edited January 3, 2016
Created April 9, 2016

a8
b8
c8
d8
e8
f8
g8
h8
a7
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a6
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a5
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a4
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a3
b3
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e3
f3
g3
h3
a2
b2
c2
d2
e2
f2
g2
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a1
b1
c1
d1
e1
f1
g1
h1
Hello everyone, for those of you who have looked at the past couple of articles with confused looks on your faces because you didn't know what "Re4" means, this article is for you! Many a time, we feel the need to go through a game we played and recall the mistakes, and having a notation for the movement of pieces on the board can really help. Or, perhaps you're reading a book by a chess author and are going through some openings, tactics or endgames. Or better yet, you want to look cooler and nerdier at the same time than all of your friends :P Well in any of those cases, algebraic notation is for you!